James Hardie concrete fiber siding
Last Post 17 Feb 2014 03:33 PM by ICFHybrid. 63 Replies.
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BobkeUser is Offline
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19 Mar 2007 12:54 PM
Has anyone tried this stuff? I think I know the Pros, but what are the Cons?

How do they handle the seams on the 4x8 stucco sheets? are they well hidden?

If I were to go with clapboards what would be the longest lasting finish?
If I paint it does it (the paint job) last longer than painted wood?
Can it be stained?

Is the price comperable to wood?

Thanks


hmp2zUser is Offline
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20 Mar 2007 07:57 PM
We're going to have Hardie board siding for our ICF home.  I can't answer some of your questions, but we are going with their Color Plus Technology, so the boards are pre-painted.  The color is guaranteed for 15 years.  We did read that, if you paint the Hardie Boards, they hold the paint longer than wood does.

I don't think they would stain so well; they are just a white color, almost like a clay or ceramic pot at one of those paint-your-dishes places.  I can't swear to the lack of staining ability, though, but, in all of their literature, I've never read anything about staining Hardie boards.  If you PM me, I can send you the cost for our siding for our 2 story house.

Cheers!
Heather W
Our ICF Home Construction Journal


Scott101User is Offline
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21 Mar 2007 09:14 PM
I have used Hardie board on several projects. The oldest being about five years. I like the product and it holds up very well. I have used the lap siding, full 4' x 8' RB panels and the Hardie Trim. However, it generates a lot of dangerous concrete dust when cut (respirator a must)with a power saw. Using a utility knife works to score it, then snap it works well, but it slows down the process and blades dull quickly. While it is a very strong product, it is very fragile when turned on edge and will easily break. That said, I just finished a job (by myself) with almost 1000-12' long boards and broke only 2 planks. The 4' x 8' sheets are much sturdier. I caulk all lap joints and all ends abutting trim with a good quality paintable caulk. Back to the 4' x 8' sheets. The joints are not very forgiving and must be vertically plumb. I typically lay down a wide bead of caulk along edge and install the first sheet. Then I but the second sheet and make sure that I get caulking squeeze along the entire seam. Then I nail and wipe off the excess caulk. A batten board will also work over the joint, but detracts from the appearance. There are probably other methods, but that is what I used. Five years later, the boards still look good. Attaching the planks and boards differ. I top nail the planks with 1 3/4" hot dipped galvanized (HDG) roofing nails. Being in a hurricane prone area, I also face nail with #8 HDG spirial siding nails with 1/8" heads and caulk the nail heads. The face nails are almost invisible. Attaching the full size sheets, I use the spirial siding nails and caulk. Hardie trim is a little more difficult to work with. It must be cut with a power saw as it is too thick to score and snap. Also, nail holes must be pre-drilled with a masonry bit or the nails will bend. I like the product, but it is very time consuming. I like the product, but you must understand its limitations and benefits.


Bob IUser is Offline
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16 Apr 2007 05:07 PM
The siding costs half of high grade vertical grain wood siding.  Labor is higher/more difficult.  Since it is essentially concrete, paint holds up very well & shouldn't be affected by moisture as is wood siding, so should last much longer.


Bob Irving
RH Irving Homebuilders
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hmp2zUser is Offline
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30 Apr 2007 07:05 PM
I just wanted to add that our builder said that Hardie Board trim pieces are EXTREMELY fragile as you are putting them up.  They cost about $15 each, and he said they snap amazingly easily!  Once they're up, they seem to be okay, but he said that, if he had it to do over, he'd use the Hardie Board for the siding, but then PVC for the trim.

Cheers!
Heather W
Our ICF Home Construction Blog


ArdoseUser is Offline
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01 Aug 2007 09:33 PM
My house is covered with Hardipanel and I used Hardisoffit under the eaves and Hardiplank for trim. It's a little harder to cut than wood. You need a special circular saw blade that costs about fifty dollars and you have to wear a dust mask. My contractor fastened it with a nail gun which worked pretty well. We used H channel to join the panels. Some people cover the joints with a thin Hardiplank.

I don't like the Hardisoffit so much. The nails pulled through it in places over time and I have had to make repairs. It may be that my contractor didn't fasten it correctly. The stuff is kind of like drywall. It's heavy and isn't very strong. It cannot be used below grade. But, my walls are just fine. The stuff also resists termites and doesn't rot or warp. The paint should stay on for a long time.


seanymph34User is Offline
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10 Oct 2007 10:29 PM
I just finished my house using only Hardie 7 1/4" Lap siding preprimed, Hardie Shingles unprimed and 5/4 8", 5/4 6", 5/4 4" Hardie Trim preprimed. My square footage was a total of 2300 square feet with 1500 sqft Lap and 800 sqft Shingles.

The results have been absolutely great. I did all the demo, repairs and improvements myself and hired a crew of 3 to do the install. I then did the nail sealing, priming and painting myself. There are alot of other types of siding but the end result is where will you get the most bang (equity increase) for your buck.


If you want some pics give me an email address.

Just MHO...........Hope this helps


seanymph34User is Offline
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10 Oct 2007 10:32 PM
Oh, and by the way James Hardie reformulated and improved cement/fiber products so they are not very fragile any more........Regards


lutztlhUser is Offline
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19 Nov 2007 09:10 AM
OK Pros... Private homeowner here about to tackle a residing job using hardie 8.25" x 12'....... Instructions from Hardie's website refer to a "Score and Snap" knife as being the #1 recommended tool for making cuts......

Anyone know what this is or where to acquire one? Lowes doesn't carry one and noone seems to have heard of it. Guy @ Lowes said just to use a chop saw w/ coarse tooth blade & a dust mask vs. the $45 saw blade pitched by Hardie -- or he said use a really sharp box cutter......

Any info would be helpful. Getting underway in 2 days.....


Chris JohnsonUser is Offline
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19 Nov 2007 05:06 PM
The score and snap tool is most likely located in the tile department since that is where they stock and sell the hardi backer for tile guys can be found, it is much easier to use a chopsaw and skil saw for cutting hardi products

Chris


Chris Johnson - Pro ICF
North of 49
SergeUser is Offline
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08 Oct 2008 11:40 PM
I would like to express my disappointment regarding James Hardie concrete fiber siding.
I live in Quebec Canada, where we have a north eastern climate of moderately warm and humid in the summer and briskly cold in the winter.
My main reason for choosing this product was maintenance free… and aesthetic.
The product was installed 3 years ago and as of today I am extremely disappointed in regards to my main reason. Maintenance free.

Suggested by the distributor at the time we did some touch up at each joint after installation. All touch up expose to the south/west sun light are extremely visible today. But worst is the paint pealing at the base of walls where we have a transition of siding to stones. According to the representative, this is normal due to the proximity of the stones…

Now they are asking me to send a sample of the siding that I will have to take from the house for paint analysis purpose. Do I really want to do their job and taking a siding of my house to get told some bs? Not really.

Let me know if you want to see pictures and I will be happy to do so.

Regards

Serge
Ps excuse my English- I am a French Canadian


ArdoseUser is Offline
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09 Oct 2008 01:48 PM
I think I understand the problem you are having. I have Hardipanel siding on my house with Hardiboard for trim. Where there is a cut edge at the bottom of the trim that is exposed to moisture, it seems to wick it up especially if it is exposed to excessive dampness such as near the bottom of a downspout, near a spigot or if the edge contacts soil. Some of the Hardi Board started to delaminate at the bottom. I glued it back together.

You may have a similar problem because stone naturally attracts moisture and is probably touching the Hardiboard. I have a suggestion for you to try. Remove any peeling paint from the Hardi Board. Then, touch up the exposed areas with stain sealer. Stain sealer is a kind of varnish that will soak into the Hardi Board and help prevent it from absorbing moisture. You might want to apply a couple of coats to be sure it soaks in as much as possible. After it dries, repaint it to match the rest of the siding.

Take a look at where the Hardi Board is peeling. Does the edge of it come into contact with the stone? Is the stone frequently damp? You might need some kind of barrier between stone and siding to prevent wicking. Maybe you could slip a piece of vinyl "L" channel under the edge of the siding to protect it from the dampness. Or, possibly, you could apply a clear water sealer to the siding edge and to the stone where it makes contact. That should encourage faster drying.

Hope this helps.



cmkavalaUser is Offline
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11 Oct 2008 11:03 AM
Although I like the Hardie siding and have installed it on many houses, I don't think it is without some problems.
I have noticed that pieces that come in contact with long term moisture do tend to become soft and delaminate or separate.
Longterm exposure to the south sun - siding seams to shrink and open up about 1/8" at the butt joints.
Hardie is definitely a better product that wood, but one should expect some unexpected maintenance


Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
SummersUser is Offline
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15 Oct 2008 01:18 PM

All very good comments relating to the Hardi product. Hardi carries a 50 year warranty on the product that is transferable, HOWEVER in almost every question /comment posted thus far I see topics that appear to be items that would Void a claim to Hardi !

NER - 405 is the Bible when it comes to an install of this product and the first thing a Hardi representative will refer to if a warranty question comes up. This report is referenced in Hardi printed material, but unless you download the eighty or so pages you don't really develop an appreciation of how demanding this specification really is. Charts on wind resistance give a new meaning to the engineering that has gone into the proper install of the product.

Most contractors and homeowners will say " Oh Yeh, I saw that ", but you must realize your dealing with a fiber and cement material that does not like moisture. Not only will the material fail if not installed in accordance with NER - 405 and the Hardi Specifications -- You may void the warranty!

I use Stablecrete on a Hardi install at all cuts, joints or anywhere there is a possibility of high amounts of water/moisture accumulation. It reacts with the Alkali found in the cement to waterproof the material. It also gives a superior bond for any coating you will want. In the case where you have water splashing up onto a painted Hardi board, it may be that this moisture is causing the Alkali in the cement to migrate out to the surface of the board, collect on the backside of your coating causing it to Burn Off.

Wonderful, Expensive Product and a company to back it up, but it hates water ! Then again so does wood !

Glenn



The Cost Effective Answer to Concrete Corrosion
ChrisvUser is Offline
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21 Oct 2008 10:32 AM
I have been selling Hardie for the past five years, and have never filed a warranty claim on behalf of a customer. That being said, I have been in the unfortunate position of having to explain to homeowners why the product failed to meet their expectations. In every case, the root cause of failure can be traced back to one thing: A lack of education.
Whether it's the contractor, builder or homeowner that's uninformed is irrelevant. The person that should be knowledgeable is, simply, the one that NEEDS to be knowledgeable. By hiring a reputable contractor, you should be comfortably assured that recommended installation practices are being followed. If you're doing the install yourself, then make sure you know all the specifics. READ the instructions. Keep the siding 2" above the flashing. Keep the trim 6" above grade. Prime, seal, and paint cut edges.
Hardie is an awesome product. I would put it on my house. (I'd use a different trim material, though. HardieTrim is a bit too brittle for my liking.)


SummersUser is Offline
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23 Oct 2008 12:42 PM
Chris,
I agree 100% about the trim. MiraTEC seems to work well for trim applications I've had. "Lack Of Education" -- Really!! All this time, I Thought that was what the spec was for? You should run for office!! Glenn


The Cost Effective Answer to Concrete Corrosion
ChrisvUser is Offline
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28 Oct 2008 04:29 PM
Absolutely, hands down, without question, I would recommend MiraTEC. The warranty, the choice of smooth or a woodgrain that matches the cedarmill design, the price (cheaper than primed pine), and the workability all make for an excellent product. I've had a piece sitting in a bucket of water in my office for almost two years now, and it doesn't show any signs of swelling. Not that you should use it in an environment like that, but you should be assured that IF YOU FOLLOW THE DIRECTIONS, you'll be fine.


f7pilotUser is Offline
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06 Nov 2008 09:06 AM
I'm looking at building a new home this spring and I am leaning towards a product called magnum board. Has anyone used this product or have any informationabout it. The reasons for selecting it is water resistance, mold and mildew resistance, flame resistance and it's strength over cement board. Any help about this profuct would be great.


GeorgiaTomUser is Offline
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06 Nov 2008 01:34 PM
Posted By f7pilot on 11/06/2008 9:06 AM
I'm looking at building a new home this spring and I am leaning towards a product called magnum board. Has anyone used this product or have any informationabout it. The reasons for selecting it is water resistance, mold and mildew resistance, flame resistance and it's strength over cement board. Any help about this profuct would be great.
a good reason not to use it----------------- is it has no approvals for siding fasteners



f7pilotUser is Offline
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06 Nov 2008 05:38 PM
Georgia Tom, are you saying because it has not approved any type of nail or screw to fasten the sidng to the wall to stay away from it? Sorry for this responce but I don't quite understand no approvals for siding fasteners, could you elaborate.

Thanks.


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