Installing windows in a solid masonry house
Last Post 14 Jul 2011 09:47 PM by cmkavala. 20 Replies.
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marliUser is Offline
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20 Mar 2011 11:12 AM
We bought an old home that we are gutting and it is a solid masonry house, so double wall of brick.  The old windows, which we are replacing, are nailed to a buck that is set onto the brick.  A lot of the wood work will need to be removed due to rot so I was wondering if we even needed to replace the wood at all or just attach the new windows directly to the brick?  This would mean a slightly bigger window and I thought it might actually help energy-efficiency wise as there wouldn't be the wood to decrease overall R value of the wall.  Has anyone done this? I'm having quite a bit of trouble finding out much about installing windows in a solid masonry house to begin with.  Thanks!
BruceUser is Offline
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20 Mar 2011 07:17 PM
Look on the Andersen Window site for their installation instructions. There is one for installation in concrete block walls. I'd assume the same could be done with brick. However, have you heard what assume can mean?
cmkavalaUser is Offline
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20 Mar 2011 08:03 PM

marli;

Most masonry installations use PT bucks, you should always  install according to the manufacturers recommendations

Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
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FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
PVonDy85User is Offline
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20 Mar 2011 11:18 PM
Buy a good reciprocating saw. Use anchor brackets. Drill 3/8" holes in the frame and use tapcon screws. Put plugs in holes. Use sill seal and good silicone caulk and fill RO with foam.
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marliUser is Offline
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20 Mar 2011 11:55 PM
Thanks for the advice everyone. I will definitely check the mfg instructions. What are "PT" bucks by the way?
cmkavalaUser is Offline
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21 Mar 2011 07:16 AM
Posted By marli on 20 Mar 2011 11:55 PM
Thanks for the advice everyone. I will definitely check the mfg instructions. What are "PT" bucks by the way?

Pressure Treated as required by code
Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
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FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
marliUser is Offline
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21 Mar 2011 10:20 AM
Ah of course, that makes sense. The number of acronyms on this site can be a little confusing at times
michaeldUser is Offline
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01 Apr 2011 11:53 AM
Installing a block frame window into a masonry opening is no problem, we do it all the time. Carefully design a weep system, anchor through the jambs, backer rod and caulking. Not a problem.
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02 Apr 2011 10:08 AM
Posted By marli on 21 Mar 2011 10:20 AM
Ah of course, that makes sense. The number of acronyms on this site can be a little confusing at times

You will also want to make sure when you order new windows they are a "flange" type and not a "fin" type
Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
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FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
thagreenUser is Offline
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04 Apr 2011 03:01 PM
This might throw tou a curve ball, sorry.
I do believe that a window is most efficient when located in middle to inside part of the wall.
Basically the less sill you have the better it is. I believe I read this somewhere don't remember where though.
Anyone else?
BruceUser is Offline
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05 Apr 2011 08:12 AM
I don't know where you read it, but that is exactly what an Inline window representative told me. He said on thick walls, like ICF, the window toward the outside tended to get colder and had a greater chance of condensation forming on it. If you moved the window to the inside of the house, less sill, the window temperature stayed closer to room temperature. The chance for condensation was decreased.
cmkavalaUser is Offline
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05 Apr 2011 09:12 AM
The further in a window sits in a masonry wall the harder it is to control water, there are precast sills made specifically for masonry installations, they typically are designed with a taper in the center of the sill to shed water. This is a good way tp control water

http://www.castcrete.com/


Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
thagreenUser is Offline
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05 Apr 2011 12:30 PM
Chris is definetly right on that one .One point for you!!
The finish would blend in with the brick much better also.
We often forget about where it should sit in the wall for max efficency and go towards practicality.

Cost difference shouldn't be a factor either since if you do the brickmold exterior flange you'll still have to finish on the inside or pay extra for sill extension.
marliUser is Offline
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05 Apr 2011 01:29 PM
Do you all know of a website that has a comprehensive guide to installing windows into masonry walls? I've seen general instructions on window mfg sites for concrete, but I'm always looking for a little bit more information.
cmkavalaUser is Offline
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05 Apr 2011 03:35 PM
Posted By marli on 05 Apr 2011 01:29 PM
Do you all know of a website that has a comprehensive guide to installing windows into masonry walls? I've seen general instructions on window mfg sites for concrete, but I'm always looking for a little bit more information.

most manufacturers have recommended installations in masonry, pick the window then get their specific instructions
Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
jonrUser is Online
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05 Apr 2011 08:16 PM
Where is the insulation on this house? Seems like window location should take that into consideration.
cmkavalaUser is Offline
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05 Apr 2011 08:55 PM
jonr;

the original poster said it was an old double brick masonry, it may not have any insulation, but the window should be installed similarly to the way is came out
Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
marliUser is Offline
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29 Apr 2011 11:53 AM
Chris, that is correct, there is currently no insulation at all, but we would like to fir(sp?) out the walls and spray foam a bit. I think this would just impact the frame such that we would need jamb extensions. We have taken the house apart around the windows a little more and there are existing wood bucks that the window has been mounted to, but some of these may need to be replaced as well. So if we do fiberglass I will look into whether or not we would actually need to replace the buck or could put in a larger window without it looking funny and have no buck.

Thanks everyone for your advice!
-- Marli
michaeldUser is Offline
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14 Jul 2011 07:00 PM
Marli

Only a bona fine energy model and calc. on your envelope's performance is going to be able to determine what benefit you are going to achieve when it comes to where in the wall you install windows.

If you don't go through that process, everything everyone here is telling you is nothing but speculation.



michaeldUser is Offline
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14 Jul 2011 07:05 PM
M

As far as "to use, or not to use" a wood buck...

There are trade offs.  Using a nailing flange "generally speaking" offers better water performance.  Although water could always potentially get behind your buck so make sure if you go that route those PT bucks are installed extremely well.

If you use a wood buck and attach with flange, you are going to need to do something to cover up that flange/buck interface.  I personally don't like that look when it comes to masonry.

So, as I mentioned before, use a sill pan.  Don't skimp there.  Size your windows 1/4" to 3/8" smaller than your openings.  Backer rod and caulk the perimeters.


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