Outswing vs. Inswing Doors
Last Post 23 May 2012 12:25 AM by Lbear. 10 Replies.
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LbearUser is Offline
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18 May 2012 11:16 PM
I am looking to get OUTSWING doors for my home. I was told that those types of doors provide better air/weather sealing vs. inswing doors. One can see this practice in hurricane french doors, as they are designed to swing out, as this provides for greater strength when the wind is pushing against them at 80MPH.

Are there any drawbacks to outswing doors?
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19 May 2012 09:30 AM
Check with your building inspector. Most won't approve a door that swings out over a step or stairs, which is to say that the landing/stoop/deck must be at the same level as the floor.
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19 May 2012 10:30 AM
Lbear,

In high wind areas, you often see outswing doors.  From my conversations with door companies at trade shows, I understand that outswing doors are more resistant to wind and water.  If you do decide to use outswing doors, just be sure that the screws and hinges cannot be easily removed from the outside.
Residential Designer & Construction Technology Consultant -- E-mail: Alton at Auburn dot Edu, 334 826-3979
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19 May 2012 11:25 AM
I have some outswing doors that we put in precisely because of the sealing issues. They are located in exposed areas, and so far, we are happy that we chose to do that. The harder the wind blows, the better they seal. The interim problem, however, is that you have to instruct people in the use of them when wind is present. People want to open it and let go of the handle. On an inswing door, the wind might push it against you, or if you stepped aside, it will coast to a stop. The outswing doors, however get caught by the wind and fly open, receiving power until they hit a stop. That can really damage them.
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19 May 2012 05:43 PM
Are commercial doors ALL outswing doors? What is the reasoning behind that?
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19 May 2012 09:40 PM
A very common "home improvement" is the addition of 'storm doors' which are always out swing and share the doorway with a 'main' door that is in swing. If the main door is out swing this 'improvement' is not possible. In using out swing doors I'd think it advisable to equip them with auto closers and limiters typical of 'storm doors'. Exterior doors are right behind windows in heat loss and air infiltration. Very few exterior doors are r5 or better & more glass means worse insulation some solid insulated doors are r10 + . I'm considering making custom door frames that hold TWO standard exterior doors, one in swing & one out swing (my walls will be about 12 3/4" thick overall). I'd use solid insulated fiberglass doors for the in swings and insulated fiberglass doors with decorative glass for the out swings. Probably would only equip the outer with deadbolt & lock. By making the frames out of cellular PVC "lumber" my frame r value would be about r25, still better than the doors even with 2 of them.
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21 May 2012 07:06 AM
Posted By Lbear on 19 May 2012 05:43 PM
Are commercial doors ALL outswing doors? What is the reasoning behind that?


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Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
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21 May 2012 07:18 AM
Out swing doors are good if you need the interior space, I have found that the weather stripping is not as good as inswing; the thresholds are a little better, as far as sealing better when wind blows harder is a fallacy.
If you use non removable hinges, the doors are almost impossible to kick in
If the wind always blew directly perpendicular to the door this would be true, but how often does that happen?
The reality is: if the wind comes from the sides or rear of the house, it causes negative pressure , much like the air flow across the top side on the wing of a plane, This creates “lift” or in the case of a door it gets “sucked outward.
One real bad thing about outwing doors is they can get caught by the wind and ripped off their hinges, even crash chains won't help in strong winds
Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
LbearUser is Offline
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22 May 2012 02:11 AM
Posted By cmkavala on 21 May 2012 07:18 AM
Out swing doors are good if you need the interior space, I have found that the weather stripping is not as good as inswing; the thresholds are a little better, as far as sealing better when wind blows harder is a fallacy.
If you use non removable hinges, the doors are almost impossible to kick in
If the wind always blew directly perpendicular to the door this would be true, but how often does that happen?
The reality is: if the wind comes from the sides or rear of the house, it causes negative pressure , much like the air flow across the top side on the wing of a plane, This creates “lift” or in the case of a door it gets “sucked outward.
One real bad thing about outwing doors is they can get caught by the wind and ripped off their hinges, even crash chains won't help in strong winds

I thought Florida hurricane code required outswing doors?

I have inswing doors in my current home and when the when blows hard from the south directly onto the doors, it pushes on the door and causes the gaskets to move and air and water (if its raining) will start to come into the home. If I push on the door from the inside, it helps to seal it better.

I know a better designed inswing door would work better but I was told outswing doors by nature seal better.




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22 May 2012 06:19 AM
Posted By Lbear on 22 May 2012 02:11 AM
Posted By cmkavala on 21 May 2012 07:18 AM
Out swing doors are good if you need the interior space, I have found that the weather stripping is not as good as inswing; the thresholds are a little better, as far as sealing better when wind blows harder is a fallacy.
If you use non removable hinges, the doors are almost impossible to kick in
If the wind always blew directly perpendicular to the door this would be true, but how often does that happen?
The reality is: if the wind comes from the sides or rear of the house, it causes negative pressure , much like the air flow across the top side on the wing of a plane, This creates “lift” or in the case of a door it gets “sucked outward.
One real bad thing about outwing doors is they can get caught by the wind and ripped off their hinges, even crash chains won't help in strong winds

I thought Florida hurricane code required outswing doors?

I have inswing doors in my current home and when the when blows hard from the south directly onto the doors, it pushes on the door and causes the gaskets to move and air and water (if its raining) will start to come into the home. If I push on the door from the inside, it helps to seal it better.

I know a better designed inswing door would work better but I was told outswing doors by nature seal better.







Lbear;
There is no requirement in Florida for outswing doors,
if your inswing door is not sealing, it was improperly installed / adjusted or getting old in need of new weather stripping.
It is a greater challenge to get in and out of a home with outswing doors during high winds without the door getting ripped off the hinges, once that happens you may not be able to close it again if its off the jamb or has "sprung" hinges.
I hate outswings during construction and if the house has them, we will secure most with double clyinder dead bolts so the subs won't leave open and get damaged
Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
LbearUser is Offline
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23 May 2012 12:25 AM
So it looks like there is really no advantage to outswing doors and that they pose a hazard in high winds.

I will have to think this one out....
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