Hydroclay Waterproofing
Last Post 26 Dec 2009 05:09 PM by 80Chevy. 6 Replies.
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heimdmUser is Offline
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25 May 2009 03:04 PM
I live in Central Indiana. I am looking at hydroclay injection water proofing for my house. Our house is located on a hill. The legnth of the high side is where we are looking to have this applied. Has anyone had this done? Where do I find someone who does this sort of work?
Bruce FreyUser is Offline
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27 May 2009 02:36 AM
By its name, I assume it is a bentonite based product.  Bentonlite is basically an expansive, impervious clay.  These products work well if, and only if, they are continuously moist.  If they repeatedly dry out, they will eventually crack to the point that they will not swell and re-seal the crack.

Bruce
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27 May 2009 06:08 AM
Yes it is a bentonite based product. We live in a forest and have wet clay. What has your experience been with the injected bentonite based clay?
Bruce FreyUser is Offline
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27 May 2009 07:41 AM
My only experience has been a loooonnng time ago where bentonite board was improperly used (we did what was spec'd) and I don't know anything about the injection you mention. 

Given a choice, I prefer to:

1.  keep water away from the foundation with appropriate grading, downspouts, etc.
2.  Have footing drains to day light and a way for water to get to the drains.
3.  Waterproofing over the footing and up the wall.

If you cannot have footing drains to daylight (which could allow soil to dry) and you have a moist environment, bentonite sounds OK, but again, I don't know anything about injecting it ....sorry...no time to research.

Look for local success stories and get a guarantee!

Bruce
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27 May 2009 08:39 AM
I find myself not in a good situation. Our lot slops east to west. The house had a reverse grade in the front yard. We had that corrected and connected the downspouts so they drain into a ravine about 100ft or so from the house. There is also 2 french drains accross the front yard that drain into the ravines. However, there are a few spots where we are still seeing water push through the concrete block. Any thoughts what to do next? Since the previous efforts had been unsucessful (the previous work has reduced the number of spots where water is penetrating), I had considered a membrane product like delta-ms plus a foundation drain. However, that would require excavating down to the footers, which probably sit about 2.5 feet deep in the front yard. Any ideas or thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
wesUser is Offline
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27 May 2009 08:39 PM
You say the footers are only 2.5 feet deep. Is your house on a basement or crawlspace?
That number just doesn't sound right for a basement. Please verify.
Wes Shelby
Design Systems Group
Murray KY
wandr@ainweb.net
80ChevyUser is Offline
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26 Dec 2009 05:09 PM
Hydroclay is a generic term for the bentonite used for waterproofing. For new construction, cardboard panels with the clay in the middle are tacked onto the below grade walls before backfilling. A round "sausage" if placed right on the exterior footer and, if your in the middle of a swamp, panels are layed on the ground under the floor and footers. Once the panels get wet, the cardboard disolves leaving the clay, coating the wall like peanut butter. Most large buildings use this process and never need to turn on the sump pump.

Existing buildings need to have the material pumped either through the ground next to the walls or from the interior with holes drilled through the wall. This method is good for walls that have cracking or missing mortar between the blocks.

While the work is straight forward, the equipment used needs to be specific for the projects, the hydroclay slurry is nearly as thick as concrete and needs to be pumped at very low pressure. The best thing is that bentonite is a naturally occuring clay, making it one of the very few green waterproofing materials.
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