Repairing SIP Wall
Last Post 13 Nov 2013 10:49 AM by pferris. 36 Replies.
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whitemUser is Offline
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01 Aug 2009 01:11 PM
Our house was built 18 years ago with professionally installed SIPs.  The walls are great, except now we have a major problem in a bathroom.  The bathtub is surrounded by ceramic tile.  We didn't realize right away that there was a leak in the grout.  When the repairman started removing the tile to fix the problem, a large section of the inside wooden part of the SIP wall completely separated from the foam.  Now there is a four foot high section on the back wall of the tub where all we see is the foam insulation.  The inside OCB part of the wall dissolved and we don't know what to do to fix it. 

We've had several repairmen look at the SIP wall but they have no idea how to repair it.  The only suggestion was to completely remove the tub, build a new wall with 2x4's in front of the SIP, then put in a new tub. 

I have looked around for how to repair SIP walls, but have found nothing.  The SIP walls were custom made and came with the drywall already on the walls when they were delivered.  I thought the bathroom walls were waterproof, but I was wrong.  Can SIP walls be repaired?

thanks!

Mary


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01 Aug 2009 01:23 PM
Mary;

SIP walls can be repaired , BUT..............

You need an engineer, it sounds like a serious problem. Being a leak caused structural damage ,your insurance should cover the costs (less ded)

Please don't let a handyman or inexperinced carpenter make repairs


Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
whitemUser is Offline
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01 Aug 2009 05:57 PM
Thank you for your response.  I have the original papers from when we built the house, but since it's been 18 years I have no idea who to contact about repairs.  How would I find an engineer who could fix this?

Mary


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01 Aug 2009 07:11 PM
Posted By whitem on 08/01/2009 5:57 PM
Thank you for your response.  I have the original papers from when we built the house, but since it's been 18 years I have no idea who to contact about repairs.  How would I find an engineer who could fix this?

Mary
Mary;

start with what you have, the original supplier or installer may be able to direct you to an engineer with SIPs expertise.
I still occasionally have contact with some of my customers from over 20 years back



Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
JeffDUser is Offline
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01 Aug 2009 07:46 PM
Mary,

This is the repair I would do. Remove all damaged OSB. Create a rectangular or square opening for a patch. Let the foam dry out. From a piece of OSB the same thickness as the panel skin, make a patch that fits very very tight to the opening. Using a poly-urethane glue, coat the entire surface of the foam and patch piece. Install the patch making sure the it is kept compressed to the foam until the glue is cured. Purchase Simpson MP36 mending plates from you hardware store. You will need as many as it will take to put them end to end around the edge of the joint between the original panel skin and the patch piece. Install each mending plate lengthwise on center with the joint and embedding it completely in poly-urethane glue. Good luck.


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02 Aug 2009 01:41 AM
These are what he's talking about...

Attachment: Untitled.jpg

Building Designer
PANELfusion, LLC, Tampa, FL
simon@panelfusion(dot com)
"Metal SIP Advocate"
cmkavalaUser is Offline
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02 Aug 2009 05:25 AM
Jeff/Simon;

since none of us can visually see the damage, their may be more destructive testing necessary to determine the full extent of the damage.
I certainly do not advise a DIY remedy, with at least one half of the structural component gone.


Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
ecobuilderUser is Offline
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04 Aug 2009 11:36 PM
How to fix this depends on what type of SIP's you have. Is this a true SIP's envelope or a stresskin design with post and beam frame work? I just finished (yesterday) repairing a SIP's roof that had leaked for several years. The osb was completely rotted in several places and needed to be replaces. This was over a post and beam structure and the SIP's were just nailed into the beams and had no real structural element. This roof required the rotted osb to be removed and replaced then tar paper installed and a cold roof system was used to cover the entire roof. We screwed 2x4's trough the panels into the beams, some locations required the screws to be placed from the inside out into the 2x4's were beams were not located and then re-plywooded and new roof shingles installed. If this had been a true SIP's structure and this had happened the panels would have needed to be completely removed and new ones put in place. As someone else stated and if this is a true SIP's structure an engineer should be called in to help resolve this but if it's a post and beam with SIP's over them you can fix it without the need for the engineer. I would suggest contacting the manufacturer of the panels and see if they can direct you to someone local who is familiar with SIP's. Good luck and next time waterproof your walls with membrane before retiling them.

Tom Pittsley
ecobuilder@aol.com
www.eebt.org


"Don't be afraid to go out on a limb. That's where the fruit is." Jackson Brown
whitemUser is Offline
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10 Aug 2009 06:19 PM
I will try contacting the supplier.  Thank you for your help.

Mary


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10 Aug 2009 06:24 PM
Thank you for the information.  I was wondering if something like that could be done. 

The bathtub is in the corner of the house, so one side of the area that needs repair is at the corner.  Are there mending plates for corners?

Mary


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10 Aug 2009 06:24 PM
Thanks for the pictures!  They helped me a lot.

Mary


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10 Aug 2009 06:29 PM
I will contact an engineer before doing anything else.  I do not know what the structural effects are of the damage.  The wall affected is on the second floor, on the corner of the house.  I'd have to dig up pictures of when the house was built, but I do remember that the panels were very wide.  To replace the entire SIP would probably be a huge job.

I had no idea that a wall could melt away like that.  Once repaired, I will not put tile back on the wall.  I'll buy waterproof tub walls that go to the ceiling.  If I had known something like this might happen, I would never have installed tile.

Thanks for your help.

Mary


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10 Aug 2009 06:32 PM
I am pretty sure they are true SIPs.  They were installed with a crane and there were no posts except near a bay window.  The windows were cut out after the panels were installed.

I will contact the manufacturer.  I thought the walls were waterproofed, but obviously not.  I won't re-tile them.  I'll install a waterproof tub surround or something instead.

Thanks!

Mary


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10 Aug 2009 07:40 PM
.  I thought the walls were waterproofed,
It is a common misconception that tile /grout is waterproof, if it was regular drywall directly applied to the osb, then it was the builders error.
It should have had at least MR board or better



Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
AltonUser is Offline
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11 Aug 2009 12:14 PM

Mary,
After you repair the structural wall, then if you never want another leak through the tile, consider using this product behind the tile.  It not only waterproofs the wall but it also allows some movement of the tile without cracking the tile:  www.schluter.com

By the way when I suggest someone to consider a product, I do not benefit from any sales.  In fact, since I retired from teaching in Architecture, I donate most of my time to interesting projects. 



Residential Designer & Construction Technology Consultant -- E-mail: Alton at Auburn dot Edu, 334 826-3979
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23 Oct 2013 10:47 AM

We have a 5yr old SIPS house on the Oregon coast. It has 25-90% moisture readings in its walls. The exterior OSB is waterlogged or seriously eroded. Is there a remedy for this condition OR must the entire SIPS walls be replaced?
Thanks.
Paul


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23 Oct 2013 12:34 PM
Posted By pferris on 23 Oct 2013 10:47 AM

We have a 5yr old SIPS house on the Oregon coast. It has 25-90% moisture readings in its walls. The exterior OSB is waterlogged or seriously eroded. Is there a remedy for this condition OR must the entire SIPS walls be replaced?
Thanks.
Paul

The SIP is most likely garbage and must be ripped out. I assume they DID NOT install a rain screen or use furring strips on the exterior cladding between the SIP?

When will the wood SIP industry finally just wise up and tell people that furring SIPs is mandatory? Especially for roofs and walls in wet climates.


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23 Oct 2013 01:25 PM
You will also want to reinstall your tile in a different manner. Grout always leaks eventually. The problem is what you have behind the tile. You need a layered drainage path or vapor barrier behind the tile that protects your repaired SIP wall. Schluter is probably the gold standard for doing this.


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23 Oct 2013 05:14 PM
get an engineer, it cannot be analyzed on thos forum


Chris Kavala
info@southernsips dot com
1-877-321-SIPS
FL. Lic # CBC036455, GA Lic. RLCO000624, LA Lic. # CL33845
pferrisUser is Offline
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24 Oct 2013 10:13 PM
LBear,
I agree: my SIPS walls are toast and must be removed, wall by wall.
Being burned once, what is  the preferred SIPS wall composition AND what are the OPTIMAL installation materials to offset air, water, wind, and humidity penetration on the Oregon coast? In other words, who's done SIPS that have lasted?
I would hate being burnt twice!
Paul Ferris



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