Retrofitting insulation to existing home
Last Post 10 Jul 2022 01:42 PM by smartwall. 4 Replies.
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MylifeinTexasUser is Offline
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07 Jul 2022 10:23 PM
Unfortunately I have a production built home from 2005 that is using that fiberboard sheathing and the pink fluffy stuff for insulation. On the exterior I have brick all the way up to the roof on the front and only on the first floor on the sides with the rest of it being the hardy plank siding. This summer has been brutal with my electric bill going to the moon so I want to do some kind of energy retrofit. Spray foam would be fantastic but it is costly so I had an idea about removing the sheet rock on the exterior walls only and replacing the fiberglass insulation with mineral wool insulation and then putting a layer of Dow blue board sheathing on the interior before the Sheetrock. I live in the Houston area so I’m not 100% sure what my climate zone is but I don’t necessarily see a huge problem since all the drying will be on the outside anyway. Could somebody enlighten me on the pros and cons of doing such a renovation?
newbostonconstUser is Offline
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08 Jul 2022 12:38 PM
I your bill going up because they have tripled the cost of your electricity? Solar is great because when the sun is shining it is making power that can be used directly to cool the house.

I would buy a $200 thermal camera that attaches to your cell phone and find the areas in your house that the heat is coming in and address those areas. I have done this and used canned sprayed foam through a 1/8 hole in the drywall to stop those areas, then just slight spackle and paint over the hole. The camera will also tell you if you just need more roof insulation or maybe have a ducting/attic problem.
"Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlins
sailawayrbUser is Offline
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08 Jul 2022 01:57 PM
Sometimes you have to face the reality that a code built production home is the crappiest home that can be legally built. It might make more sense to learn from the experience, sell it, and do things far better next time around. Folks often throw lots of good money after bad into trying to improve a dog without doing a ROI analysis to learn that there really isn't any.
Borst Engineering & Construction LLC - Competence, Integrity and Professionalism are integral to all that we do!
MylifeinTexasUser is Offline
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09 Jul 2022 08:46 PM
I like the thermal camera idea to pinpoint some hotspots at certain times of the day because the front of my house faces south so during the summertime the entire rear of the home is exposed to the sun and I have a corner lot so when the sun is setting to the west the entire west side of my home is exposed to the sun. Unfortunately I don’t have the budget nor am I rich enough to go build me a custom energy efficient home so I’m trying to think of solutions that I can do right here right now but the energy cost are not necessarily the only thing that’s the problem because the main problem is that the air-conditioning system can’t keep up with the demand. I have no problem replacing sheet rock and the insulation in the cavities of the wall so that’s why I was proposing this idea as a cheaper alternative than stripping the brick and siding off the exterior of the home to do it the right way. My question was pertaining mainly to is it feasible and should the walls get wet they should be able to drive to the outside because there is no vapor barrier that I’m aware of.
smartwallUser is Offline
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10 Jul 2022 01:42 PM
As we used to say in the insulation business : sealing and ceiling that's what's iimportant. Make sure your ceiling insulation are up to snuff. Then pull out the caulking gun and go to work. Every joint or trim strip should be caulked the the dywall. Use foam light switch and outlet seals. I wouldn't even consider drywall removal in a 25 year old house where you live. Simple things can make the biggest results.
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