vacuum insulated glass
Last Post 17 Apr 2023 08:37 PM by briancornwell. 5 Replies.
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elicUser is Offline
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13 Jul 2022 03:44 PM
Does anyone have experience with vacuum insulated glass?

Are there any companies that have panels that don't use a front facing plug? Not sure why from an engineering standpoint they can't pull the vacuum from the edge and seal from the edge...

How large can you get these panels?
EmilyBUser is Offline
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21 Mar 2023 09:26 PM
Did you find anything out about this? I've never heard of vacuum insulated glass. Could you let me know what the benefits are? Is it more affordable/efficient? Is it similar to double glazing?

I'm currently looking into all my options. It feels like I'm discovering new innovations every day.
newbostonconstUser is Offline
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22 Mar 2023 03:26 PM
Vacuum glass is not fesible.

For a 3x4 window the force is 25,000 lbs on the glass

3 feet = 36 inches
4 feet = 48 inches
36 inches * 48 inches = 1728 sq inches
atmospheric pressure is 14.7 pounds per sq inch.
So 14.7 * 1728 = 25.401 pounds of force on the glass.
"Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlins
AltonUser is Offline
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23 Mar 2023 02:27 PM
See: https://www.vg12.com/
" . . . The company mission is to develop an affordable Vacuum Insulated Glazing (VIG) for windows. Essentially, a VIG is a flat, transparent thermos bottle that dramatically reduces window heat loss. Two panes of glass, separated by tiny spacers, are sealed around the edges. The vacuum between the two panes virtually eliminates conduction and convection heat loss. A Low E coating on one pane cuts radiation heat loss.

Unlike argon, vacuum will not conduct heat, no matter how thin the gap. As a result, V-Glass glazing will be as thin as a piece of ΒΌ inch thick plate glass."
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newbostonconstUser is Offline
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23 Mar 2023 04:15 PM
Nice progress they have made....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lp38Gc8RgzQ
"Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlins
briancornwellUser is Offline
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17 Apr 2023 08:37 PM
Large enough, but the problem is not so much so the VIG, which has it's own historical issues but the manf process itself. For the longest time, and currently, they are made in China. Nothing is coming out of the USA. There was a glimmer of possibility years ago, but that manf factory closed. It would take a serious, and I mean serious, amount of $ funding to produce these VIG's in America. With one giant failure, will anyone ever attempt it again? Factor in all of VIG issues, which are known, and well, that's where the industry is situated right now.
High performance building + modern architecture. Passive House construction.

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Built my first Passive house in my early 30's in Boulder, CO. Lots of insulation, air sealing, and job site fun.
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