North Georgia SCIPS house
Last Post 02 Feb 2021 05:30 PM by voldie. 38 Replies.
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rlsmith017User is Offline
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21 Nov 2014 03:04 PM
We started construction late last month on our SCIPS home in north Georgia. This website has been an invaluable resource to me in planning my house. One way I can return the favor is by passing along what I learn in the process. I have started a blog to track the progress, which can be found here

The first two posts are now online: one with background information on the project and one with the excavation and footings. I hope this is of some value - I certainly learned a lot from Jim's blog on his Florida project. If you have questions I will try to answer them as time permits.

Roger
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rlsmith017User is Offline
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22 Nov 2014 08:14 AM
The correct link is http://northgeorgiascipshouse.blogspot.com/
Roger
jonrUser is Offline
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22 Nov 2014 12:22 PM
How much thermal bridging will there be between the footings and interior surfaces?
rlsmith017User is Offline
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22 Nov 2014 01:14 PM
jonr:
There shouldn't be much thermal bridging. We will use EPS underneath the slab and an EPS thermal expansion joint between the slab and the interior wythe of mortar.
Roger
jonrUser is Offline
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22 Nov 2014 04:22 PM
So your interior side concrete wall directly contact the cold footings? Or can you set the wall on top of some high density horizontal foam and run rebar through it?
JellyUser is Offline
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22 Nov 2014 09:43 PM
looks like the footing will be deep underground, so thermal bridging wouldn't be as much of a concern as wicking of moisture. But the fastfoot may take care of that.

Roger, I've never seen a foundation like that - very interesting. So I assume you excavated to the level where the fastfoot is placed, so it is on undisturbed soil?
rlsmith017User is Offline
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22 Nov 2014 10:49 PM
jonr
Yes, the interior side concrete will directly contact the footings - I don't think the engineer would buy replacing mortar with foam.
Roger
rlsmith017User is Offline
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22 Nov 2014 10:50 PM
Jelly:
The FastFoot is designed to prevent wicking. And yes, it was indeed excavated so that the footing was on undisturbed soil.
Roger
AltonUser is Offline
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22 Nov 2014 11:02 PM
The waterproofing on the wall will come down and overlap the FAST FOOT membrane and footer.  This should direct the water to the foundation drain.  This should greatly reduce the footer and wall's ability to transmit water vapor to the basement.
Residential Designer & Construction Technology Consultant -- E-mail: Alton at Auburn dot Edu Use email format with @ and period . 334 826-3979
JellyUser is Offline
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23 Nov 2014 11:27 PM
I like it. Looking forward to following the project
jonrUser is Offline
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24 Nov 2014 10:41 AM
looks like the footing will be deep underground, so thermal bridging wouldn't be as much of a concern...
To me it looks like at least one side of the building will have footers close to grade level. So heat/cold travels down the exterior wall, across the footing and then back up the interior wall. Berming soil (or some better insulator) against the lower portion of the exterior walls would help some (by creating a longer path).

I'd consider painting a stripe of Drylok on the top of the footings to further block water/moisture wicking up the interior walls.
rlsmith017User is Offline
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05 Dec 2014 11:01 AM
Two new posts have been added: a very short one with additional thoughts on using the FastFoot system plus one on the logistics of using SCIPS.

http://northgeorgiascipshouse.blogspot.com/
Roger
rlsmith017User is Offline
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11 Dec 2014 09:27 PM
A new post is now online, with the first week of placing panels.

http://northgeorgiascipshouse.blogspot.com/
Roger
newbostonconstUser is Offline
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13 Dec 2014 05:58 AM
Very good info. ...thanks for sharing
"Never argue with an idiot. They will only bring you down to their level and beat you with experience." George Carlins
GeorgiaTomUser is Offline
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19 Dec 2014 07:10 AM
looking at the blog pictures, was wondering about the concrete coverage on the epoxied dowels, will only have 3/4" plaster cover? It doesn't seem like enough coverage
jonrUser is Offline
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19 Dec 2014 08:49 AM
Good question. With the amount of moisture in the lower wall area, I would think that galvanized rebar, more cover, an admixture or perhaps epoxy rebar would be necessary to prevent long term corrosion. Rebar on the interior side would be drier.
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19 Dec 2014 09:32 AM
GeorgiaTom, was your concern about resistance to shear or about corrosion?
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21 Dec 2014 08:24 AM
Jelly : concern is both corrosion and shear, it does not look like there is sufficient embedment (code is minimum 1-1/2 cover above ground 3" below ground )for corrosion in any direction. it looks like a thin veneer covering so I am also wondering what is holding it to the footer and keeping it from moving around
AltonUser is Offline
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21 Dec 2014 02:21 PM
Although the blog pictures may not show it, there will be a row of rebar dowels on each side of the wall.  Using a double row of dowels may be one reason for the light embedment.

I think it would be better to use non-rusting basalt rebar, especially if the embedment is thin.  Basalt rope might even be a better idea for the area of the wall above the basalt rebar dowels.
Residential Designer & Construction Technology Consultant -- E-mail: Alton at Auburn dot Edu Use email format with @ and period . 334 826-3979
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21 Dec 2014 08:03 PM
They were recently renovating a 100-year old masonry courthouse in the area and what they discovered is that the building suffered major rebar corrosion which began to compromise the buildings structural integrity. Mind you this was for a Zone 4B area (high desert) so precipitation is very low.

The engineers stated that problem was that the exterior of the masonry building was NOT waterproofed and when it rained the concrete absorbed the moisture and it began to corrode the rebar.

Alcatraz has been corroding from the inside out for decades because the moisture ridden salt air got through the concrete and the rebar began to corrode.

Being this home is in Georgia (humid/wet) climate, will they waterproof the exterior concrete walls?
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