Cold Joints in ICF walls
Last Post 23 Aug 2022 05:00 PM by ICFBdr. 3 Replies.
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thoner7User is Offline
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22 Apr 2022 12:21 AM
Im curious everyones opinion on cold joints in the walls. For example, if one wanted 14' walls, with another 18" or so needed below grade, thats a tall wall for a DIY to pour. Add a vaulted ceiling with ICF gables and it grows taller yet. And I dont think it could be vibrated that deep either. So, could you pour that wall in 2, or 3, separate pours? I heard a rumor once that green concrete, if less than a week old, would meld together with another pour on top. I don't think that's true however. But with sufficient variations in height and a rough edge, you could get enough of a mechanical bond between the layers I believe. Could you pour roughly 6 feet at a time and do this in 3 stages? Using a conveyer truck would save pump costs.
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20 Aug 2022 10:41 PM
I do our cold joints as near a floor system as reasonable. As soon as the concrete sets in an hour or two, I don't see how there would be melding.
Brad Kvanbek - ICFconstruction.net
smartwallUser is Offline
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21 Aug 2022 09:59 PM
That's why you install rebar in concrete. Concrete always cracks, even if it's just micro fractures. A DIYer should never try a 14' pour. Most pros couldn't do it with an icf. In my long career I've only poured once with a conveyer and would never do it again. Much more control with a pump. Unless you are foolish enough to leave it one spot and fill the wall to the top, then move it again. Void city.
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23 Aug 2022 05:00 PM
Agree with ICFConstruction. Cold joist should be placed at a point in the wall where additional lateral support is provided. Your ICF supplier will likely have specs on size/spacing of rebar at the cold joint. If required at the mid-point of a wall, engineering may be needed for this detail based on local code.
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